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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
here in washington. it is a heated rivalry. >> bill: even if your team loses, don't you think you would wear the gear? >> i have the hat. i am absolutely loyal. they played a solid game last night. right up until they didn't win. >> they almost won. >> spoken like a true fan. they played a great game until they lost. >> bill: here's what it sounded like on espn right at the end there. >> rejuvenated football in the nation's capital. redskins and giants split. it looks like they've won a game here at fedex field. and all they are is within a game of the division lead. >> bill: 17-16. >> i will say as a giants fan the redskins are a solid contender this year and they have a fabulous rookie quarterback. >> bill: rgiii. >> he's very good. >> bill: there we go. we've got the nats and redskins coming up. whoa suddenly, sports town. >> i wouldn't get too carried away with that. the last couple of games they looked very good. they also lost to the panthers this season and they had some very terrible games. if th
see already, there is a different tone in washington. i think elections matter. the voters spoke. even though the race was relatively close, it was not that close in the electoral college. even the margin has expanded now to 4 million votes. i think people read those results. i think, for example, on an issue like immigration reform, the prospects for passing comprehensive immigration reform in the near future -- near future are much greater than they were three weeks ago because of the result of the election. i think the chance of coming to an agreement on this fiscal cliff are greater today because of this election. politicians read election results. i do not know whether our campaign or their campaign fostered the environment for that. i think the voters did, and that is as it should be. >> the last couple questions -- we will come back to this side. >> my question is, in the days following the election there was a fair amount of coverage about the divisiveness of the obama for america ground game -- i was wondering, how you need you think that model was for this campaign and candid
is really terrific is the bipartisan spirit. carol and i are going down to washington at a time with the hyper partisanship. people are really divided. what i really want to do is bring common sense, bring those granite state values. women have always worked in new hampshire, since the mills. look at new hampshire history, women have worked for generations. if you want something done, you ask a busy woman. look at the folks around this room. what i feel is we are not unique in this ability, but we do know how to bring people together to get things done. that is the most important quality that any of us could bring, certainly what governor elective hassan is going to face in the state. we all need to come to get there. men and women. our country needs our help. >> a great point. fill. you are the second woman governor in the state -- you feel a weight on your shoulders as a role model? >> i think all leaders want to do a really good job. i feel an enormous responsibility to serve the people of new hampshire as well as i can and leave the state a better place, even as good as it i
was that our supporters would read this and it would spend -- especially in washington, the world's biggest record chamber -- people would get nervous and worried. when those things happen, you find everyone very generous with their advice. [laughter] the frustration was less than we be worried about where we were but other people's behavior and that it would create a disillusionment among supporters. so we spent a lot of the campaign fighting back against some of these polls. what was remarkable about this race, as looking of the data that we had, it was not how volatile it was, but how steady it was. from february through november, we were running in our own data generally a two-point to 4-point lead. we never fell behind. there was a time in september, after the conventions, we had a strong convention and they had not so strong convention, and came the famous 47% tape. we got a six-point or seven- point battleground states lead. some republican leaning voters moved away from romney. and then can the first debate, which we strategically planned a little suspense for. [laughter] >> there w
in the white house. tonight, on c-span. >> columnist george will spoke recently at washington university in saint louis about the role of religion and politics. it was hosted by the center on religion and politics will hear from former senator john danfor th, just before mr. we will speaks. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special
joining us from the capitol with the very latest is todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international and a regular guest on the newshour. so todd, you're back with us again. six hours to go until midnight. progress reported but still to deal. >> senate republicans, judy, the latest thing that has happened is senate republicans came out of a conference meeting with their leader, with mitch mcconnell all sounding positive. they all echoed what you had in the piece there from mcconnell saying they were very, very close to sequester the automatic spending cuts remain an outstanding issue. and kind of got thrown into the mix again today. you know, the president in that appearance in the executive office building today in front of a supportive crowd, not really a press conference, more of like a minirally, talked about the sequester and his desire to have any delay in the sequester paid for with revenue increases. you know, i talked to a few house members just a few moments ago. not only ot tone of the president's presentation, but also that demand w
's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international and a regular guest on the newshour. so todd you're back with us again. six hours to go until midnight. progress reported but still to deal. >> senate republicans, judy the latest thing that has happened is senate republicans came out of a conference meeting with their leader, with mitch mcconnell all sounding positive. they all echoed what you had in the piece there from mcconnell saying they were very, very close to sequester the automatic spending cuts remain an outstanding issue. and kind of got thrown into the mix again today. you know the president in that appearance in the executive office building today in front of a supportive crowd, not really a press conference, more of like a minirally talked about the sequester and his desire to have any delay in the sequester paid for with revenue increases. you know, i talked to a few house members just a few moments ago. not only ot tone of the president's presentation but also that demand which they consider move og the goalpost even though democrats dispute that on the
? is there a singular documentary film, television show, which stands out to you? >> "mr. smith goes to washington." no matter what your politics are, i cannot imagine anyone watching that film not being somehow moved to have a voice. to be able to put a voice to experience and your point of view. i suppose that gets me every time. >> good choice. >> mine was "it's a wonderful life." it was a snapshot of an imagined america. to the extent that was a window to the rest of the world, people at their best. >> my reaction was "saturday night live." i love politics, i love the sport of politics. i like satire. >> i am going to cheat and say "12 angry men." >> all of holland came to a stop at 7:00 on monday night. thank you very much. >> cinematic columnist george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then it james taylor -- james taylor in his recent appearance at the national press club. later, the life of senator robert byrd. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i came down edl was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i went to work for john lindsay, but i would not work f
. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors and please chiefs. we have never, to my knowledge, had anybody who has ever created, let alone starred in movies or tv series until tonight. and we have michael lynn on the to thank for that. mike sl co-
for as far as the eye can see. listen, washington has a spending problem, not a revenue problem. and if the president doesn't agree with our proposal, i believe he has an obligation to families and small businesses, to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we're ready and eager to talk to the president about such a plan. >> speaker, you spoke with the president earlier this week. can you characterize this call? if he called, did he have any kind of counteroffer? and also, we understand that he's just making clear that it's got to be increase in rates for the wealthy or no deal. are you willing to give a little bit, maybe just not all the way to 39.6? >> it was -- the phone call was pleasant but was just more of the same. the conversation that the staff had yesterday, just more of the same. it's time for the president, if he's serious, to come back to us with a counteroffer. >> mr. speaker, the jobs report today indicated unemployment is down roughly a full point from last time at this year. a lot of people say that if no deal happens it cou
] a fabulous researcher at "the washington post" and gabriel banks. eventually i found her and i can tell all that story because not because of the book but because of she had an abusive ex-husband eventually i found an article in "the new york times" about a lot of connections. obama writes about a new girlfriend. he is going up to her family's estate. this wealthy area in connecticut. >> host: at columbia university, a classmate of the president, to be honest, he had never had many black friends, he said. i saw that switch happened most markedly during the period that i was most close to him. barack obama was the most liberal person i ever met in terms of instructing his own identity. his achievement was really an achievement in the modern world. >> guest: beenu mahmood was one of a group of pakistani friends that barack obama had. they shared with him the he was comfortable that these guys. at columbia law school, they were very good guys. it is true that obama did his best. when i interview president obama in the oval office, he talked about the supporters in new york. but he started to m
in politics who don't like the republicans who do not like the democrats, who do not like washington, you know what they do like? they like barack obama because they sense something about him that he's not a part of it. so even that first debate there we thought was a debacle, a lot of us people thought "well, i liked that because he's not playing th game, he's not playing gotcha, he's not saying nasty things." that that helped the balance for him. >> rose: i'll tell you who didn't like it, his campaign staff. >> i asked, -- at the end of the interview i said to him i ran into somebody during the course of the campaign who useded to work for you who is now the mayor of a major american city. >> rose: could it be chicago? (laughs) >> and i said to him "what happened, rahm, in that first debate?" and rahm looked at me and said "he haa hawaii moment." and when i said that the president laughed very loudly and he caught himself back and he told this lovely story there meant meant that when things seemed to be going to hell in a hand basket he and rahm would sit in the oval office and think "what w
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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